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1 : Floating at random; in a drifting condition; at the mercy of wind and waves. Also fig.

2 : The difference between the size of a bolt and the hole into which it is driven, or between the circumference of a hoop and that of the mast on which it is to be driven.

3 : The distance between the two blocks of a tackle.

4 : The place in a deep-waisted vessel where the sheer is raised and the rail is cut off, and usually terminated with a scroll, or driftpiece.

5 : The distance to which a vessel is carried off from her desired course by the wind, currents, or other causes.

6 : The angle which the line of a ship's motion makes with the meridian, in drifting.

7 : The distance through which a current flows in a given time.

8 : A passage driven or cut between shaft and shaft; a driftway; a small subterranean gallery; an adit or tunnel.

9 : A deviation from the line of fire, peculiar to oblong projectiles.

10 : A tool used in driving down compactly the composition contained in a rocket, or like firework.

11 : A slightly tapered tool of steel for enlarging or shaping a hole in metal, by being forced or driven into or through it; a broach.

12 : In South Africa, a ford in a river.

13 : A collection of loose earth and rocks, or boulders, which have been distributed over large portions of the earth's surface, especially in latitudes north of forty degrees, by the agency of ice.

14 : The horizontal thrust or pressure of an arch or vault upon the abutments.

15 : A drove or flock, as of cattle, sheep, birds.

16 : A mass of matter which has been driven or forced onward together in a body, or thrown together in a heap, etc., esp. by wind or water; as, a drift of snow, of ice, of sand, and the like.

17 : Anything driven at random.

18 : That which is driven, forced, or urged along

19 : The tendency of an act, argument, course of conduct, or the like; object aimed at or intended; intention; hence, also, import or meaning of a sentence or discourse; aim.

20 : Course or direction along which anything is driven; setting.

21 : The act or motion of drifting; the force which impels or drives; an overpowering influence or impulse.

22 : A driving; a violent movement.

23 : That causes drifting or that is drifted; movable by wind or currents; as, drift currents; drift ice; drift mud.

24 : To enlarge or shape, as a hole, with a drift.

25 : To drive into heaps; as, a current of wind drifts snow or sand.

26 : To drive or carry, as currents do a floating body.

27 : to make a drift; to examine a vein or ledge for the purpose of ascertaining the presence of metals or ores; to follow a vein; to prospect.

28 : To accumulate in heaps by the force of wind; to be driven into heaps; as, snow or sand drifts.

29 : To float or be driven along by, or as by, a current of water or air; as, the ship drifted astern; a raft drifted ashore; the balloon drifts slowly east.

30 : Anything that drifts.

31 : Deviation from a ship's course due to leeway.

32 : A bolt for driving out other bolts.

33 : of Drift

34 : of Drift

35 : Having no drift or direction; without aim; purposeless.

36 : An upright or curved piece of timber connecting the plank sheer with the gunwale; also, a scroll terminating a rail.

37 : A smooth drift. See Drift, n., 9.

38 : Same as Drift, 11.

39 : A common way, road, or path, for driving cattle.

40 : Seaweed drifted to the shore by the wind.

41 : A driving wind; a wind that drives snow, sand, etc., into heaps.

42 : Fig.: Whatever is drifting or floating as on water.

43 : Wood drifted or floated by water.

44 : Full of drifts; tending to form drifts, as snow, and the like.

45 : A bank of drifted snow.

46 : Spray blown from the tops waves during a gale at sea; also, snow driven in the wind at sea; -- written also spindrift.

(46) words is found which contain drift in our database

For drift word found data is following....

1 : Adrift

adv. & a.

Floating at random; in a drifting condition; at the mercy of wind and waves. Also fig.

2 : Drift

n.

The difference between the size of a bolt and the hole into which it is driven, or between the circumference of a hoop and that of the mast on which it is to be driven.

3 : Drift

n.

The distance between the two blocks of a tackle.

4 : Drift

n.

The place in a deep-waisted vessel where the sheer is raised and the rail is cut off, and usually terminated with a scroll, or driftpiece.

5 : Drift

n.

The distance to which a vessel is carried off from her desired course by the wind, currents, or other causes.

6 : Drift

n.

The angle which the line of a ship's motion makes with the meridian, in drifting.

7 : Drift

n.

The distance through which a current flows in a given time.

8 : Drift

n.

A passage driven or cut between shaft and shaft; a driftway; a small subterranean gallery; an adit or tunnel.

9 : Drift

n.

A deviation from the line of fire, peculiar to oblong projectiles.

10 : Drift

n.

A tool used in driving down compactly the composition contained in a rocket, or like firework.

11 : Drift

n.

A slightly tapered tool of steel for enlarging or shaping a hole in metal, by being forced or driven into or through it; a broach.

12 : Drift

n.

In South Africa, a ford in a river.

13 : Drift

n.

A collection of loose earth and rocks, or boulders, which have been distributed over large portions of the earth's surface, especially in latitudes north of forty degrees, by the agency of ice.

14 : Drift

n.

The horizontal thrust or pressure of an arch or vault upon the abutments.

15 : Drift

n.

A drove or flock, as of cattle, sheep, birds.

16 : Drift

n.

A mass of matter which has been driven or forced onward together in a body, or thrown together in a heap, etc., esp. by wind or water; as, a drift of snow, of ice, of sand, and the like.

17 : Drift

n.

Anything driven at random.

18 : Drift

n.

That which is driven, forced, or urged along

19 : Drift

n.

The tendency of an act, argument, course of conduct, or the like; object aimed at or intended; intention; hence, also, import or meaning of a sentence or discourse; aim.

20 : Drift

n.

Course or direction along which anything is driven; setting.

21 : Drift

n.

The act or motion of drifting; the force which impels or drives; an overpowering influence or impulse.

22 : Drift

n.

A driving; a violent movement.

23 : Drift

a.

That causes drifting or that is drifted; movable by wind or currents; as, drift currents; drift ice; drift mud.

24 : Drift

v. t.

To enlarge or shape, as a hole, with a drift.

25 : Drift

v. t.

To drive into heaps; as, a current of wind drifts snow or sand.

26 : Drift

v. t.

To drive or carry, as currents do a floating body.

27 : Drift

v. i.

to make a drift; to examine a vein or ledge for the purpose of ascertaining the presence of metals or ores; to follow a vein; to prospect.

28 : Drift

v. i.

To accumulate in heaps by the force of wind; to be driven into heaps; as, snow or sand drifts.

29 : Drift

v. i.

To float or be driven along by, or as by, a current of water or air; as, the ship drifted astern; a raft drifted ashore; the balloon drifts slowly east.

30 : Driftage

n.

Anything that drifts.

31 : Driftage

n.

Deviation from a ship's course due to leeway.

32 : Driftbolt

n.

A bolt for driving out other bolts.

33 : Drifted

imp. & p. p.

of Drift

34 : Drifting

p. pr. & vb. n.

of Drift

35 : Driftless

a.

Having no drift or direction; without aim; purposeless.

36 : Driftpiece

n.

An upright or curved piece of timber connecting the plank sheer with the gunwale; also, a scroll terminating a rail.

37 : Driftpin

n.

A smooth drift. See Drift, n., 9.

38 : Driftway

n.

Same as Drift, 11.

39 : Driftway

n.

A common way, road, or path, for driving cattle.

40 : Driftweed

n.

Seaweed drifted to the shore by the wind.

41 : Driftwind

n.

A driving wind; a wind that drives snow, sand, etc., into heaps.

42 : Driftwood

n.

Fig.: Whatever is drifting or floating as on water.

43 : Driftwood

n.

Wood drifted or floated by water.

44 : Drifty

a.

Full of drifts; tending to form drifts, as snow, and the like.

45 : Snowdrift

n.

A bank of drifted snow.

46 : Spoondrift

n.

Spray blown from the tops waves during a gale at sea; also, snow driven in the wind at sea; -- written also spindrift.

This word drift uses (5) total characters with white space

This word drift uses (5) total characters with white out space

This word drift uses 5 unique characters: D F I R T

Number of all permutations npr for drift word is (120)

Number of all combination ncr for drift word is (120)

Similar matching soundex word for drift

2 same character containing word for drift

3 same character containing word For drift

4 same character containing word For drift

All permutations word for drift

All combinations word for drift

All similar letter combinations related to drift

From Wikipedia

Drift or Drifts may refer to:

From Wiktionary

See also: Drift

Contents

  • 1 English
    • 1.1 Etymology
    • 1.2 Pronunciation
    • 1.3 Noun
      • 1.3.1 Derived terms
      • 1.3.2 Translations
    • 1.4 Verb
      • 1.4.1 Derived terms
      • 1.4.2 Translations
  • 2 Dutch
    • 2.1 Etymology
    • 2.2 Pronunciation
    • 2.3 Noun
      • 2.3.1 Derived terms
  • 3 Icelandic
    • 3.1 Pronunciation
    • 3.2 Noun
      • 3.2.1 Declension
      • 3.2.2 Synonyms
  • 4 Norwegian Bokmål
    • 4.1 Etymology
    • 4.2 Noun
      • 4.2.1 Derived terms
    • 4.3 References
  • 5 Norwegian Nynorsk
    • 5.1 Etymology
    • 5.2 Pronunciation
    • 5.3 Noun
      • 5.3.1 Derived terms
    • 5.4 References
  • 6 Swedish
    • 6.1 Etymology
    • 6.2 Noun
      • 6.2.1 Declension

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English drift, dryft (act of driving, drove, shower of rain or snow, impulse), from Old English *drift (drift), from Proto-Germanic *driftiz (drift), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰreybʰ- (to drive, push). Cognate with North Frisian drift (drift), Saterland Frisian Drift (current, flow, stream, drift), Dutch drift (drift, passion, urge), German Drift (drift) and Trift (drove, pasture), Swedish drift (impulse, instinct), Icelandic drift (drift, snow-drift). Related to drive.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: drĭft, IPA(key): /dɹɪft/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun[edit]

drift (countable and uncountable, plural drifts)

  1. (physical) Movement; that which moves or is moved.
    1. (obsolete) A driving; a violent movement.
      • 1332, King Alisaunder (1332)
        The dragon drew him [self] away with drift of his wings.
    2. Course or direction along which anything is driven; setting.
      • Richard Hakluyt (c.1552-1616)
        Our drift was south.
    3. That which is driven, forced, or urged along.
      • 1892, James Yoxall, chapter 5, in The Lonely Pyramid:
        The desert storm was riding in its strength; the travellers lay beneath the mastery of the fell simoom. [] Drifts of yellow vapour, fiery, parching, stinging, filled the air.
    4. Anything driven at random.
      • John Dryden (1631-1700)
        Some log [] a useless drift.
    5. A mass of matter which has been driven or forced onward together in a body, or thrown together in a heap, etc., especially by wind or water.
      a drift of snow, of ice, of sand, etc.
      • Alexander Pope (1688-1744)
        Drifts of rising dust involve the sky.
      • Kane
        We got the brig a good bed in the rushing drift [of ice].
    6. The distance through which a current flows in a given time.
    7. A drove or flock, as of cattle, sheep, birds.
      • Thomas Fuller (1606-1661)
        cattle coming over the bridge (with their great drift doing much damage to the high ways)
    8. A collection of loose earth and rocks, or boulders, which have been distributed over large portions of the earth's surface, especially in latitudes north of forty degrees, by the retreat of continental glaciers, such as that which buries former river valleys and creates young river valleys.
      • 1867, E. Andrews, "Observations on the Glacial Drift beneath the bed of Lake Michigan," American Journal of Science and Arts, vol. 43, nos. 127-129, page 75:
        It is there seen that at a distance from the valleys of streams, the old glacial drift usually comes to the surface, and often rises into considerable eminences.
    9. Driftwood included in flotsam washed up onto the beach.
  2. The act or motion of drifting; the force which impels or drives; an overpowering influence or impulse.
    • Robert South (1634–1716)
      A bad man, being under the drift of any passion, will follow the impulse of it till something interpose.
  3. A place (a ford) along a river where the water is shallow enough to permit crossing to the opposite side.
  4. The tendency of an act, argument, course of conduct, or the like; object aimed at or intended; intention; hence, also, import or meaning of a sentence or discourse; aim.
    • 1977, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, Penguin Classics, p. 316:
      'Besides, you lack the brains to catch my drift. / If I explained you wouldn't understand.'
    • Joseph Addison (1672-1719)
      He has made the drift of the whole poem a compliment on his country in general.
    • Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)
      Now thou knowest my drift.
  5. (architecture) The horizontal thrust or pressure of an arch or vault upon the abutments.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  6. (handiwork) A tool.
    1. A slightly tapered tool of steel for enlarging or shaping a hole in metal, by being forced or driven into or through it; a broach.
    2. A tool used to pack down the composition contained in a rocket, or like firework.
  7. A deviation from the line of fire, peculiar to oblong projectiles.
  8. (mining) A passage driven or cut between shaft and shaft; a driftway; a small subterranean gallery; an adit or tunnel.
  9. (nautical) Movement.
    1. The angle which the line of a ship's motion makes with the meridian, in drifting.
    2. The distance a vessel is carried off from her desired course by the wind, currents, or other causes.
    3. The place in a deep-waisted vessel where the sheer is raised and the rail is cut off, and usually terminated with a scroll, or driftpiece.
    4. The distance between the two blocks of a tackle.
    5. The difference between the size of a bolt and the hole into which it is driven, or between the circumference of a hoop and that of the mast on which it is to be driven.
  10. (cricket) A sideways movement of the ball through the air, when bowled by a spin bowler.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

drift (third-person singular simple present drifts, present participle drifting, simple past and past participle drifted)

  1. (intransitive) To move slowly, especially pushed by currents of water, air, etc.
    The boat drifted away from the shore.
    The balloon was drifting in the breeze.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 11, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      One day I was out in the barn and he drifted in. I was currying the horse and he set down on the wheelbarrow and begun to ask questions.
  2. (intransitive) To move haphazardly without any destination.
    He drifted from town to town, never settling down.
  3. (intransitive) To deviate gently from the intended direction of travel.
    This car tends to drift left at high speeds.
    • 2011 January 15, Saj Chowdhury, “Man City 4-3 Wolves”, in BBC:
      Midway through the half, Argentine Tevez did begin to drift inside in order to exert his influence but by this stage Mick McCarthy's side had gone 1-0 up and looked comfortable.
  4. (transitive) To drive or carry, as currents do a floating body.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of J. H. Newman to this entry?)
  5. (transitive) To drive into heaps.
    A current of wind drifts snow or sand
  6. (intransitive) To accumulate in heaps by the force of wind; to be driven into heaps.
    Snow or sand drifts.
  7. (mining, US) To make a drift; to examine a vein or ledge for the purpose of ascertaining the presence of metals or ores; to follow a vein; to prospect.
  8. (transitive, engineering) To enlarge or shape, as a hole, with a drift.
  9. To oversteer a vehicle, causing loss of traction, while maintaining control from entry to exit of a corner. See Drifting (motorsport).

Derived terms[edit]

  • bedrift
  • drift along
  • drift apart
  • drift off

Translations[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch drift, also dricht, from Old Dutch *drift, from Proto-Germanic *driftiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Noun[edit]

drift f (plural driften)

  1. passion
  2. strong and sudden upwelling of anger: a fit
  3. violent tendency
  4. flock (of sheep or oxen)
  5. deviation of direction caused by wind: drift
  6. path along which cattle are driven

Derived terms[edit]

  • driftig, geestdriftig
  • aandrift, geestdrift, sneeuwdrift
  • driftkikker driftsneeuw

Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /trɪft/

Noun[edit]

drift f (genitive singular driftar, nominative plural driftir)

  1. snowdrift

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

  • drífa

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse drift

Noun[edit]

drift f, m (definite singular drifta or driften, indefinite plural drifter, definite plural driftene)

  1. operation (av / of)

Derived terms[edit]

  • driftskostnad
  • firehjulsdrift
  • framdrift, fremdrift
  • gruvedrift

References[edit]

  • “drift” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse drift

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /drɪft/

Noun[edit]

drift f (definite singular drifta, indefinite plural drifter, definite plural driftene)

  1. operation (av / of)
  2. drift (being carred by currents)
  3. drive (motivation)

Derived terms[edit]

  • driftskostnad
  • firehjulsdrift
  • gruvedrift

References[edit]

  • “drift” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse dript, from Proto-Germanic *driftiz.

Noun[edit]

drift c

  1. urge, instinct
  2. operation, management (singular only)

Declension[edit]

Declension of drift 
SingularPlural
IndefiniteDefiniteIndefiniteDefinite
Nominativedriftdriftendrifterdrifterna
Genitivedriftsdriftensdriftersdrifternas